Viceregal Representatives before 1867

​The position of Lieutenant Governor has existed in Canada since before Confederation. In 1786, the post of Governor-in-Chief of British North America was created as a central viceregal office overseeing the British colonies of Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the province of Québec. The governors of these regions became lieutenant governors, though that of Québec was occupied simultaneously by the Governor-in-Chief. This structure remained in place until the 1791 partitioning of Québec into Upper and Lower Canada, where both had a Lieutenant Governor, though both posts were occupied by the incumbent Governor General of the Province of Canada.​​​​​​​​​​​

Governors General of the Province of Canada (1840–1867)

  • The Viscount Monck, 1861–1867
  • Sir Edmund Walker Head, 1854–1861
  • The Earl of Elgin and Kincardine, 1847–1854
  • The Earl Cathcart, 1846–1847
  • Sir Charles Metcalfe, 1843–1845
  • Sir Charles Bagot, 1842–1843​
  • The Lord Sydenham, 1840–1841

Lieutenant Governors of Upper Canada (1791–1840)

  • The Lord Sydenham, 1839–1840
  • Sir George Arthur, 1838–1839
  • Sir Francis Bond Head, 1836–1838
  • Sir John Colborne, 1828–1836
  • Sir Peregrine Maitland, 1818–1828
  • Francis Gore, 1806–1811
  • Samuel Smith (Administrator), 1817–1818
  • Sir Frederick Philipse Robinson (acting Governor), 1815
  • Sir George Murray (acting Governor), 1815
  • Sir Gordon Drummond (acting Governor), 1813–1814
  • Francis de Rottenburg (acting Governor), 1813
  • Sir Roger Hale Sheaffe (acting Governor), 1812–1813
  • Sir Isaac Brock acting Governor), 1811–1812
  • Alexander Grant (Administrator), 1805–1806
  • Peter Hunter, 1799–1805
  • Peter Russell (Administrator), 1796–1799
  • John Graves Simcoe, 1791–1796
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